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This spring, the Center for the Study of Public Life (CSPL) is showcasing several classes taught by some exciting and unusual visitors, in addition to some wonderful classes taught by Wesleyan professors. The following courses still have seats available:

·  Community Research Seminar (SOC 316), cross-listed with ENVS, the Civic Engagement Certificate, and the Environmental Studies Certificate

Taught by Rob Rosenthal (1.5 credit, meets M/W 10:50 am-12:10 pm) – contact Course Assistant Maddie Scher for the application and with any questions

Teams of students learn the theory and practice of doing community research while carrying out research for local nonprofits, community organizations, and activist groups.  1.5 credits.  Highly challenging, highly rewarding. This year’s projects include research on how institutional and systemic racism effects of Communities of Color in Middletown (for the Middlesex Coalition for Children) and the long-range effects of service-learning courses (for the Wesleyan Service-Learning Program).

·  Group Psychology in Politics: Local, State, and National Perspectives (CSPL 206)

Taught by Middletown’s Mayor Dan Drew (0.5 credits, meets Friday 1:20-4:10 pm) – open to first-years!

This course is an introduction to the use of group dynamics to understand the deep personal and systems-level issues at play in the body politic. This framework is applicable at the local, state, national, and international levels. Often, if not most of the time, these issues play an outsized role in any public policy initiative, debate, vote, action, deliberation, and discourse, though they are rarely acknowledged. This class will examine group dynamics as it is practiced in the field of organizational development (OD), a branch of organizational psychology used to implement cultural changes across social systems. The application of OD to politics is not widespread, but its tools are useful in understanding the dynamics in political situations and in the understanding of how power is exercised. The course will introduce concepts in open systems theory and will introduce three models to hold the data in our case studies: the Burke-Litwin Model, BART, and GRPI. 

·  Topics in Journalism: Writing, Wit, and the Natural World (CSPL/WRCT 250K)

Taught by Koeppel Fellow Richard Michael Conniff (1 credit, meets T/R 2:50-4:10 pm)

This course will engage students as readers and writers of essays, opinion pieces, and long form articles about the natural world. We live in the shadow of climate change and the sixth great extinction event. So when is outrage effective, and when does wit or irony allow a writer to find a more persuasive voice? What’s the role of objectivity in a world where everybody seems to be shouting? We’ll consider the work of such writers as Gerald Durell, David Quammen, Elizabeth Kolbert, and Peter Matthiessen. Students will also write regularly and collaborate together in class to critique and improve one another’s work. 

·  Collaborative Cluster Initiative Research Seminar II (CSPL 321)

Taught by Sean McCann and Charles Barber (0.5 credit, meeting time TBA) – POI (open to any interested students)

Students participating in the Collaborative Cluster Initiative will take this course in the spring semester. They will continue with projects started in the fall semester. This is a continuation of CSPL320. This course will supplement the seminars providing historical and cultural background of the prison system in the United States. The emphasis will be on the practical application of topics engaged in the other seminars and contemporary concerns related to the prison system in the U.S. We shall follow current debates at both the national and state level, including legislation, media, and university initiatives. Students will also visit local sites. Speakers will visit the class to share their experiences and expertise. Students will conduct individual research projects and present them in workshop fashion.

·  Music Movements in a Capitalist Democracy (CSPL 333)

Taught by singer/songwriter Dar Williams (1 credit, meets Wednesday 1:20-4:10 pm)

This course will focus on music movements that have used the presentation, expression, and production of music and music events to facilitate sociopolitico transitions. The vital context of these movements is the United States in particular, where the speed and power of commerce, as well as the concentration of capital, present unique opportunities for progressive values and goals in music.

We will look at huge events, like the Newport festivals, Woodstock, Michigan Womyn’s Music Festival, Lillith Fair, and Bonnaroo, and examine how these movements have both evolved and spread their tendrils into the world (if they have). We will also spend some time on smaller, grassroots venues and music series in Chicago, Boston, San Francisco, and New York and see how blues, folk, punk, and “Americana” venues have affected and interacted with their communities. We will look at how music scenes evolved and grew and sometimes became institutions, like the Chicago Old Town School of Music.

·  Topics in Education, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship: Social Entrepreneurship in Education (CSPL 341B)

Taught by Harber Fellow Bernard Dean Bull (1 credit, meets T/R 10:20-11:40 am)

This seminar focuses upon educational innovation and entrepreneurship as a form of social entrepreneurship, some of society’s greatest challenges in education. Learners will survey critical issues in contemporary education and explore innovative and entrepreneurial efforts to address these issues. Learners will explore how diverse education startups, non-profit organizations and NGOs, individuals and grassroots groups, K-12 schools, Universities, foundations, professional associations and others are responding to these issues in innovative ways. As the course progresses, learners will explore the roles of foundations, corporations, and government policies and regulations upon educational innovation and entrepreneurship. As part of this course, learners will work individually or in groups to research solutions to a pressing contemporary educational challenge and propose/pitch a means of addressing that challenge through social entrepreneurship.

The Wesleyan Sustainability Office is hiring!  Please apply if you’re interested and share with others who may be interested:

Communication and Outreach Intern: Are you interested in sustainability? Want to help lead change on campus? Want to learn more about web design and pick up some communication skills? Then consider applying to be the Communication and Outreach Intern starting in February 2017! This awesome job will have you working on publicizing events & projects all throughout campus to promote sustainability! You will also be involved in strategic planning for the office and act as liaison between administration, faculty, staff and students. You’d be working within an established structure with as much support as needed! It’s a great opportunity to learn how to be an operator of change with an important issue!

Apply through the Google Form by Sunday, January 29 at https://goo.gl/Vvx6CP!  Questions can be directed to jkleindienst@wesleyan.edu

Juniors – Please be sure to complete your course and teaching evaluations to avoid delays in seeing your course grades. There are now two forms of the evaluations. – Dean Thornton

New Teaching Evaluations Update

Wesleyan is implementing a new teaching evaluation form this fall.  The majority of classes will use the new teaching evaluation form, with new questions.  However, a small number of classes will continue to use the old form for a few more terms, so some students will complete a different form for certain classes.  There will be one landing page for all student course evaluations, with a link to the correct form for each course.

“Professor Meet-and-Greet” – Thurs., 12/1, 4:30 p.m., Judd 113

Royette Tavernier

Come learn more about ongoing research on campus! PSI CHI  (Wesleyan’s psychology honor society) is hosting a Professor Meet-and-Greet with Prof. Royette Tavernier.  Prof. Tavernier is a developmental psychologist, whose research program examines the link between sleep and psychosocial adjustment. This is a great way to get to know professors in a more informal space, to ask questions, and to get to know fellow psychology majors and non-psychology majors.

**This event is open to all students.** Coffee and donuts will be provided! No need to RSVP. Any questions, please contact any of the Psi Chi officers.

The University of Michigan invites outstanding individuals to apply for the Michigan Humanities Emerging Research Scholars Program (MICHHERS). This program is designed to encourage rising seniors, recent B.A.s and terminal Master’s students from diverse cultural, economic, geographic, and ethnic backgrounds to consider pursuing a doctoral degree in humanities at the University of Michigan. Our goal is to attract diverse scholars with unique experiences who foster innovation and push the humanities to meet today’s challenges. For 2017, students interested in the fields of English, History, Linguistics, Romance Languages and Literatures, Sociology (qualitative), and Women’s Studies (any humanities field) are eligible.

This summer research experience, running from Tuesday, June 6 to Wednesday, June 14, 2017, will help students learn about the various fields within their chosen discipline along with the latest methodologies and developments from faculty in individual departments. Students will have the opportunity to work on a piece of their own scholarship or develop a research project in consultation with U-M faculty and graduate students in their field. Attention will also be given to articulating the importance of diversity to the development of the humanities. Students will receive practical instruction on applying to graduate school and pursuing careers inside and outside academia.

http://www.rackham.umich.edu/michhers

Sub Free Dinner--Nov. 18th 2016_Final

PYSC341_NewCourseAnnouncement

NEW COURSE:  CGST210

Q:  What is linguistics?

A: It’s the study of language, its structures, and the way it works.

We’re pleased to be re-introducing into the Wesleyan curriculum an introductory course on Linguistics, to be taught by Prof. Louise Neary in Spring 2017.  This course will introduce students to some of the principal areas like phonology  (the study of the sounds of language),morphology (the structure of words), syntax (the structure of sentences) and semantics (the meaning of language). 

This course has no prerequisites and will be interesting for anyone curious about how and why humans make the sounds we make. 

Check out Wesmaps for more info.  Offered M & W—2:50-4:10 p.m.

Please register for the upcoming class dinner with Wesleyan alumnae and current Visiting Professor Corinna Zeltsman. Professor Zeltsman will discuss her motivation to pursue graduate school and some of her experiences and advice. The dinner will be catered by Typhoon Thai Restaurant on Tuesday, November 15, 2016 * Allbritton Center Room 311 * 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM.
This event will be limited to the first 25 students (from the class of 2018) to register by Sunday, November 13th.

Thank you, Dean Thornton

Professor Lisa Dierker will offer a small section of PSYC105 (Foundation of Contemporary Psychology) in Spring 2016 to teach content through digital projects. It is a nice opportunity for junior non-psych majors to pick up an SBS gen ed as a small project-based section. The section (2) is POI.  

For additional information, write to Professor Dierker at ldierker@wesleyan.edu

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