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PIRG Campus Action works to organize, amplify, and empower students as we tackle the issues that shape our future, and we are hiring for full-time positions.

Click here to see more about the job!

We need to save the planet, defend the public interest, and protect consumers. To achieve that, we need to imagine what society should look like in the future, and we need to overcome opposition by special interests in the present to get there. The future belongs to young people. It’s up to them to dream it up, and their idealism, energy, and vision will build the people power to make it a reality.

 We know college students have the power to make a difference. From the Freedom Riders of the ‘60s to the voter registration

drives of today … from the anti-apartheid movement of the ‘80s to the drive for fossil fuel divestment now — students are always pushing our communities, our country and our world forward.

With PIRG Campus Action, you’ll work with students who, like you, believe it’s our right, and responsibility to shape the future we all want. You’ll work with students to decide the strategies and tactics they’ll use to run campaigns

that promote clean energy, public health, a stronger democracy and more.

 As a Campus Organizer, you’ll:

  • Engage and mobilize hundreds of students on issues ranging from tackling
  • climate change and getting big money out of politics to organizing voter registration drives and increasing recycling on campus.
  • Recruit and train students to plan and run effective campaigns on
  • and off campus, using skills like organizing news conferences, building strong coalitions, generating grassroots support and direct advocacy.
  • Build a strong, sustainable student funded, student run organization
  • on campus
  • Build relationships with other student groups, faculty and administrators
  • During the summer, each organizer runs a citizen outreach office.
  • You’ll recruit and lead a team of canvassers to fundraise for important issues.

We’re hiring for positions in California, Massachusetts, Oregon, New Jersey, North Carolina and a few other states.

Application deadline is soon and positions

are competitive- please submit the application ASAP to be considered for our group second round interviews on 11/11/17.

Click here to apply today

“The Wesleyan Mathematics and Science Scholars (WesMaSS) Program plans to break the Guinness world record for the largest number of people rolling down a hill within an hour. This event is scheduled from 10-12 noon on Saturday, November 4.  Come join the fun and raise Cardinal spirit by having students, staff and the Middletown community work together to break a world record and get into the Guinness Book! COME for STICKERS, to WIN Cool Raffle Prizes, and a chance to throw your dorm a DESSERT PARTY!!!

Foreign Service Careers with Max Krafft ’09 Thursday, 10/19 12pm • Career Center

Max Krafft ’09 is a diplomat in the Foreign Service of the Department of State. His first assignment was to the U.S. Consulate in Guadalajara, Mexico. In November, he heads to Norway to begin his assignment to the U.S. Embassy in Oslo. Max specializes in Public Diplomacy — a combination of public affairs work, planning cultural and educational programs and exchanges, and relationship building — but he also has experience with a broad range of diplomatic activities, including helping American citizens in distress (including those injured or arrested overseas), meeting with foreign government officials, and planning events with visiting American artists and authors. He speaks Spanish and Norwegian, both of which he learned at the Foreign Service Institute, as well as some German and Arabic. His pre-Foreign Service career includes stints as a marketing copywriter, video producer/director, bicycle mechanic, and baker.

Max began at Wesleyan with the Class of 2004, but took a break from his studies a couple years in, during which time he served in the U.S. Army as a bass guitar player in a military band. He returned to finish his degree in English with the Class of 2009, graduating with University Honors. While at Wesleyan, Max was active in the LGBT+ community and the campus music scene, and worked as a Writing Tutor and for the Sound Co-op. He is a member of the Eclectic Society and was inducted into Phi Beta Kappa. Max credits his liberal arts experience at Wesleyan with helping prepare him for diplomatic work, which requires creativity, flexibility, persistence, and the ability to understand and communicate with people from other cultures and backgrounds.

https://app.joinhandshake.com/events/94417/share_preview

The application for Winter Session Financial Aid is open. To be eligible for aid, you must currently be receiving need-based Wesleyan grant funds, and new this year: International students receiving need-based grant funds may be eligible to receive aid for Winter Session! Need-based grant funds are limited and students also should expect to consider student loans. Applying for financial aid does not obligate you to take a course; if you’re considering Winter Session but are not sure, please apply for aid anyway.

  • Apply for Wesleyan grant aid by October 25, using the link in your Portal’s Courses Bucket.
  • You will receive an award letter Friday, October 27.
  • Enroll in your course beginning Monday, October 30: bring your paper enrollment form, award letter, and payment for the difference between tuition and your award to the Winter Session office (74 Wyllys).
  • If you plan to use student loans to pay for your course, please consult with your financial aid advisor to make sure you have enough loan availability to cover both Winter Session and the spring term – and to complete the additional loan request process.
  • Applications for grant aid will not be accepted after Wednesday, October 25. Need-based grant funds are limited and will not meet full need, as Winter Session is an optional term.

More information about Winter Session, including the course list, is available at http://www.wesleyan.edu/wintersession. Winter Session takes place January 8-21. Course registration, housing requests, and dining requests will open on October 30. Winter Housing and Dining requests will only be accepted until Thursday, November 30 at noon.

Please direct all questions to winter@wesleyan.edu.

1. Law School Admissions: Process & Strategy

Friday, October 13, 12:15pm-1:15pm, Boger Hall, room 114.

Conducted by Elizabeth Madigan, Esq., Assistant Director of Admissions, Brooklyn Law School, this session is for students applying to law school AND for those who are undecided. Questions addressed will include: Should I apply to law school? Where should I apply? How do I strategically present my strengths and profile? How do I handle possible deficits? Ms. Madigan will cover all aspects of the application, including your LSAT score, transcript, letters of recommendation, personal statement and other essays, character and fitness issues, and resumes. You will gain insight as to how these components are viewed from the perspective of an admissions officer. Co-sponsored by the Gordon Career Center, the College of Social Studies, the Government Department, Deans Renee Johnson-Thornton and Jennifer Wood, and the Wesleyan Mock Trial Association. 

2. Columbia Law School & Financial Aid

Tuesday, October 17, 12:00pm-1:00pm, Boger Hall, room 110.

Danielle Lev, Associate Director of Admissions, Columbia Law School, will discuss this top-ranked law program, the nuances of the application process, and financial aid for law school in general. Of note will be Columbia Law School’s financial aid options. Note that Columbia Law School admitted three graduates from the Class of 2017. This information session is co-sponsored by the College of Social Studies, the Government Department, and Wesleyan Mock Trial.

From: Writingworks Wesleyan <writingworks@wesleyan.edu>
Date: Tuesday, October 3, 2017 at 4:23 PM
Subject: Thesis/Essay Roundtables

Hello, Thesis and Essay Writers! Back by popular demand, the Writing Workshop is offering a resource that would support YOU as you write your thesis, and help the process seem less isolating.  Monthly roundtable discussions at the DFC with a writing tutor and four other students would allow you to discuss thesis topics, practice your “elevator pitch,” ask questions of others who might be able to offer useful suggestions, and even just VENT about how things are going for you as you’re planning and writing.  The costs of lunch would be covered by the Writing Workshop, and the time commitment is only one lunch hour each month over the course of October, November, and December.   

For those of you who might be interested, topics of Thesis Roundtables could include: Preparing for thesis presentations; how to talk about your thesis with your friends, professors, family, etc; “Does my research question make sense?”; what to do when your advisor doesn’t email you back; how to get the most out of thesis advisor meetings; how to make the most of the library resources; how to keep track of citations and sources; where to work if you don’t get a carrel; etc.

If this sounds like an opportunity that you’d benefit from, please fill out the interest form below no later than THIS FRIDAY, October 5th at 2pm.  As long as there is sufficient interest, we’ll then group you with four other students so you can set up your October lunch date. We want to help you enjoy the thesis-writing process!  

Best,

Emery Frick

Ford Fellow in the Writing Programs

307 Shapiro Writing Center

116 Mt. Vernon St.

Middletown, CT 06459

(860) 685-3125

writingworks@wesleyan.edu

Please review this document and the other materials in the online senior packet and contact Dean Thornton (217 North College, 860.685.2764, rjohnson01@wesleyan.edu) if there is anything that you do not understand or if you foresee anything that could prevent your graduation in May.

Graduation does not happen by accident; it requires your time and attention to a number of details. You must fulfill all graduation requirements to participate in the May commencement ceremony. If you do not intend to graduate in May 2018, contact Dean Thornton immediately to clarify your class standing.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

As you review your academic history and credit analysis and finalize your course selections for the semester, you should keep Wesleyan’s graduation requirements in mind:

  1. Concentration. Satisfactory completion of a major is required for graduation. Consult with your major advisor about specific departmental or program requirements and use the Major Concentration form to list all courses required for your major, including completed courses, courses in progress, and courses that still need to be taken.
  2. Credit. A minimum of 32.00 credits (without oversubscription) is required for graduation. At least 16.00 of these credits must be earned at Wesleyan or in Wesleyan-sponsored programs. (More information on oversubscription is provided below.)
  3. GPA. A cumulative average of at least 74.00 percent is required.
  4. Residency. At least six semesters in residency at Wesleyan as a full-time student for students entering in their first year is required. (For students entering as sophomore transfers, at least five semesters in residency at Wesleyan as a full-time student; for students entering as midyear sophomores or junior transfers, at least four semesters in residency at Wesleyan as a full-time student is required.) A semester in residence is defined as any semester in which a student attends classes on the Wesleyan campus, has attempted at least three credits and received at least one grade.

MAJOR CERTIFICATION

To satisfy the concentration requirement, a student must complete a departmental major, an interdepartmental major, or a collegiate program. It is your responsibility to know the requirements for your major. As a senior expecting to graduate in May 2018, you are required to formalize your progress toward completion of the concentration requirement with your major advisor by completing the Major Certification Form.

  1. The Major Certification Form functions as your “contract” with your department, so you need to list all those courses that you have completed or will be completing to fulfill major requirements. Other courses taken but not required for completion of the major need not be listed.
  2. The Major Certification Form can be accessed through the “Student Tools—Academics” bucket in your WesPortal.
  3. A Major Concentration Form must be completed for each major you intend to complete.

Click here for detailed information about how to submit the Major Certification Form

Click here for the Major Certification process FAQ.

Click here for Frequently Asked Questions about the Senior Packet and Graduation Requirements.

CREDIT ANALYSIS

The credit analysis is a review of your academic record that shows your progress towards meeting graduation requirements with regard to credits and other academic regulations. It monitors oversubscription and flags potential problems that may affect completion of graduation requirements. It does not address major requirements. The credit analysis is comprised of two parts, the summary (first page) and the credit detail (remaining pages).

The summary page is divided into three sections:

  1. Total semesters at Wesleyan and total semesters in residence, as well as total credits earned and potential credits at the end of the semester.
  2. “Categories with Credit Limits,” which monitors oversubscription in credit limits within categories.
  3. “Credit Limits within Departments,” which indicates oversubscription within a subject.

The credit detail in the remaining pages lists credits by department and program. If a given course appears in more than one department or program–i.e., is cross-listed–it will be counted for purposes of oversubscription in all departments in which it is listed.

Courses for which you are pre-registered are included in the credit analysis. However, if you studied abroad last semester, your credits may not yet be posted, even though the semester has been counted in the semester totals. As you review your credit analysis, keep a copy of your academic history on hand and be ready to consult Wesleyan’s academic regulations. Your credit analysis is available through your e-portfolio and is updated every night.

OVERSUBSCRIPTION

The oversubscription rule is designed to prevent a student from building a program of study that is too narrow. Any credit in excess of the department or category limits will not count towards the 32.00 credits required to graduate (although the credits will be recorded on the transcript and will be factored into the grade point average calculations). More specifically, the oversubscription rule stipulates:

  • Of the total 32.00 credits required for graduation, a student can count no more than 16.00 course credits in any one subject.
  • If a course is cross-listed, it counts towards oversubscription in every subject in which it is listed, regardless of the cross-listing that the student chose during course registration.
  • The oversubscription rule applies to all credit that is part of a student’s academic history, including pre-matriculant credit, Advanced Placement, and other test credit, and transfer credit.
  • The following interdisciplinary programs are exempt from oversubscription: African American Studies, Archaeological Studies, Feminist, Gender and Sexuality Studies, Latin American Studies, Medieval Studies, Russian and East European Studies, and Science in Society.

In addition, the oversubscription rule limits the number of credits that can count toward the 32.00 required for graduation in the following categories:

  1. Physical Education and Student Forum:
    • no more than 1.00 Physical Education credits
    • no more than 2.00 Student Forum (419, 420) credits
    • no more than 2.00 credits in Physical Education and Student Forums combined
  2. Teaching Apprenticeships (491, 492): no more than 2.00 credits.
  3. Individual (401, 402, 403, 404, 421, 422) and Group Tutorials (411, 412): no more than 4.00 credits combined
    • some LANG courses are considered individual tutorials
    • honors thesis tutorial credits (409, 410) are not considered individual or group tutorials
  4. Independent Study (467, 468, 470) and Education-in-the-Field (465, 466, 469): no more than 4.00 credits combined
  5. Summer credits: no more than 2.00 credits during any given summer
  6. Pre-matriculant credits (including AP, IB and other test and transfer credit): no more than 2.00 credits

Oversubscription will not jeopardize graduation as long as you have enough useable credit to meet the 32.00 credits required for graduation. If you have any concerns about oversubscription, contact Dean Thornton immediately.

DECEMBER COMPLETION

Some members of the Class of 2018 who have taken a semester’s leave of absence or who transferred to Wesleyan as second-semester sophomores may complete graduation requirements at the end of the Fall 2017 semester. All students who will have completed their eight Wesleyan semesters at the end of the Fall semester, or who are expecting to complete their degrees in December, should contact Dean Thornton as soon as possible if they have questions about their graduation status.

While one may complete one’s degree in December, no one graduates in December. Graduation takes place only once a year, in May.

HONORS

Click here, if you plan to be a candidate for Honors. Also, a few points to remember: If you are enrolled on a per credit basis in your last semester (either fall or spring) for only the second half of your honors thesis in order to complete your thesis, then that semester does not count as a Wesleyan semester for residency purposes, since you would not be a full-time student. This may result in problems with the residency requirement.

SENIORS ON FINANCIAL AID

Banks and schools are experiencing difficulties in the follow-up and collection of student loans used to pay educational costs. Since most difficulties result from students not understanding their responsibilities after the completion of their educational program, schools are required to conduct exit interviews with any student completing the undergraduate degree.

Exit interviews are required by the federal government, and failure to conduct them could cause the loss of Wesleyan’s eligibility for federal student aid funding. Therefore, we will withhold the diploma of any student who fails to appear for an interview. Please contact the Financial Aid Office directly to arrange for an exit interview.

OTHER THINGS TO DO

Make sure that all outstanding transfer credit, test credit, or any other academic credit you expect to apply toward your record is processed immediately. Remember that only 2.00 pre-matriculant credits may count toward your degree. A delay in posting additional credits toward your record will result in an incomplete and inaccurate review of your graduation record that could leave you with potentially serious complications.

A FINAL WORD

Do not hesitate to contact Dean Thornton (217 North College, 860.685.2764; (rjohnson01@wesleyan.edu) at any time if you have any questions regarding the graduation process. While we will do everything we can to facilitate the process, each student is responsible for his or her own graduation and for making sure that there are no surprises in May 2018.

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